Reading

 

One of the most important things your child learns in school is how to read. And you can help.

You can make sure that your child understands that the world is full of things to read and that reading happens all the time. When you and your child are shopping or crossing a street, look at the signs. Talk about what they say and mean. At home or on the street, point out newspapers, magazines, letters, and packaged goods. Draw your child’s attention to the words in advertisements, directions, recipes, and bills. Visit a library or bookstore and find books about everything imaginable-history, cooking, religion, art, literature, and much more.

Look at books together with your child at home. Find a quiet place. Make it a special time. Have your child read aloud to you. Observe the pictures. Recall the story together. Share the wonders and enjoyment of a good book.

You can make literacy a part of your child’s life in other ways too. You and your child might recite poems, retell folktales, explore legends and myths. You might work on word puzzles, play games, or use a cookbook together. You might give books on special occasions.

All of these things will help your child become a reader. Children who read do better in school; they acquire skills they will need throughout their lives. Reading is an important part of a child’s heritage.